Using Simulated Patients to Enhance Basic Life Support Training for Allied Health Students

Mrs Jodi Ullrich1, Mrs Kathryn Fitzgerald1

1Wa Centre For Rural Health, Geraldton, Australia

Abstract:

The WA Centre for Rural Health (WACRH) offers rural clinical placements for Allied Health students. As part of orientation, students complete basic life support (BLS) certification.
Traditional BLS training includes assessment of theory followed by practice sessions on a half torso mannequins
While effective for teaching technical skills, the mannequins are unable to provide feedback such as prior to collapse such as body language or explanation of symptoms such as chest pain, inability to breathe and also verbal or painful response when assessing the response of the casualty- all aspects that are critical to the management of a life threatening event.
To create this feedback and add to the BLS program WACRH has incorporated scenarios using simulated patients. Simulated patients (SP) are individuals that are trained to portray a real person with the appropriate signs and symptoms of a deteriorating patient in a situation relevant to the students’ clinical practice. The student needs to respond not just to the patient’s condition but to the environment including the appropriate means of calling for help in the different settings health professional can work.

The SP adds an authenticity to the students’ learning as during the scenario they must interact, communicate and develop a relationship before reacting and recognising the need to apply the newly learnt skill of basic life support.

The feedback from the students regarding the addition of the SP is that it is more realistic as it enables them to see how to react in a real clinical situation.


Biography:

Jodi Ullrich has in worked rural and remote areas as a Registered Nurse for 15 years. She has passion for working with children and providing health professional education mainly in the area of simulation based training programs. She currently works as the Simulation Educator for the WA Centre for Rural health based in the Midwest region of Western Australia

Best practice management of the hemiplegic upper limb: Utilising audio-visual technology and a skilled facilitator to provide education to clinicians in regional Victoria

Mr Thao Nguyen1, Ms Jan Quiney1, Mrs Samantha Plumb1

1Melbourne Health, Parkville, Australia

Abstract:

Aims: To implement and evaluate an upper limb management course for regional physiotherapists and occupational therapists using audio-visual technology and a skilled facilitator.

Methods: This project continues the work of ‘Best practice management of the hemiplegic upper limb: Utilising telehealth to provide education to clinicians in regional Victoria’ (Quiney et al 2016). The method of course delivery was modified in response to feedback. This modified version utilised a recording of the course, in conjunction with a skilled facilitator to deliver the practical components. The facilitator visited two regional sites in Victoria. One site was involved in the original telehealth course and their feedback was sought comparing delivery methods. Feedback from the second regional site, which had previously not participated in any course, was compared to prior face-to-face courses at the Royal Melbourne Hospital.

Results: Participant feedback following each course suggested a high level of satisfaction with this modified delivery, with scores equivalent to face-to-face courses and higher than for the original telehealth course. This course was more fluent and clear and the skilled facilitator fostered better engagement with participants than the telehealth course.

Significance of the findings to Rural Health

This study demonstrates that skilled facilitation of practical components and engagement with course participants provides a better quality learning experience when using telehealth modalities. This may inform the design of courses for the education and development of rural physiotherapists and occupational therapists.


Biography:

Thao Nguyen is a Grade 2 Physiotherapist in the Neurosciences Division at The Royal Melbourne Hospital, as part of Melbourne Health in Parkville. He has a Master of Clinical Education and is passionate in the development of clinical skills and practice in undergraduate and postgraduate physiotherapy education. Thao has worked predominantly with stroke, neurology and neurosurgery patients for over 10 years and has also spent some time in the UK as well.

New learning program sees guardianship matters fast tracked

Mrs Sue Steele-Smith1

1Health Education And Training Institute Nsw, Gladesville, Australia

Abstract:

In 2016, NSW Health identified an issue with the process of appointing guardians for people who were considered unable to make their own decisions. Lack of understanding and awareness about guardianship matters among staff resulted in patients experiencing lengthy hospital stays. Patients were waiting on average 83 days before discharge from hospital, for a decision to be made through the guardianship process.

The NSW Whole of Health program, in collaboration with the Local Health Districts and Specialty Health Networks, developed new guardianship application guidelines. The goal was to ensure patients who do not need to be in hospital were placed in the most suitable setting as quickly as possible. To support the effective implementation of the new guidelines, HETI developed and delivered a training package that would educate staff about the new guidelines throughout NSW.

This is the first training program focussing on guardianship, conducted within NSW Health. As an educational intervention, the program resulted in a reduced length of stay in hospital from 83 days (prior to the guidelines and training) to 27 days post implementation.  The results demonstrate that this was achieved through the successful roll out of both the e-learning and the face to face training package. The increased confidence and knowledge of staff in this area, resulted in faster decision-making and the right care being provided in the most appropriate setting as quickly as possible. Effective workforce development in this area, supported both improved practice and practice change.


Biography

Sue Steele-Smith has worked for more than 30 years as an Occupational Therapist in a range of clinical settings and has a Masters of Health Science Education. She has also worked as an education consultant and RTO manager which involved training more than 500 allied health assistants, both in NSW and nationally.  She was involved in developing the Allied Health Assistant Framework.  Following her move to HETI she has been involved in the development, implementation and evaluation of Allied Health specific training programs.  This has included Lymphoedema, Allied Health Assistant supervisor training, Clinical supervision, the Allied health Governance guide and more recently Guardianship application training workshops.

Best practice management of the hemiplegic upper limb: Utilising telehealth to provide education to clinicians in regional Victoria

Mr Thao Nguyen1, Ms Jan Quiney1, Mrs Samantha Plumb1

1Melbourne Health, Parkville, Australia

Abstract:

Aims: To develop, implement and evaluate an upper limb management course for regional clinicians using telehealth videoconferencing technologies.

Methods: A pre-existing upper limb management course  was modified for delivery to regional settings. Regional clinical ‘champions’ were recruited and attended training to deliver the practical components of the course. The course was facilitated via telehealth from Melbourne. Participant feedback was collected following the course and at 3-months follow-up and compared to prior courses run on-site at the Royal Melbourne Hospital.

Results: The upper limb management course was successfully implemented across three regional sites, involved the training of 12 regional ‘champions’ and 51 regional course participants. Participant feedback showed high level of satisfaction with the telehealth course; however, several scores were lower than those obtained from prior face-to-face courses, related to presentation quality and course facilities. Three month evaluation demonstrated a change in utilisation of hemiplegic upper limb management modalities.

Significance of the findings to rural health:

This study highlights the challenge of delivering clinical education via telehealth. The practical components and skill development were reliant on the ‘champions’ to deliver and limited feedback was  provided by experts towards the participants’ performance. Face-to-face delivery of the course was rated more positively compared to the telehealth version by participants and the expert educators in regards to quality for most of the presentations. These findings provide further opportunity to modify the course, to better meet the needs of regional physiotherapists and occupational therapists. A phase 2 study is currently underway.


Biography:

Thao Nguyen is a Grade 2 Physiotherapist in the Neurosciences Division at The Royal Melbourne Hospital, as part of Melbourne Health in Parkville. He has a Master of Clinical Education and is passionate in the development of clinical skills and practice in undergraduate and postgraduate physiotherapy education. Thao has worked predominantly with stroke, neurology and neurosurgery patients for over 10 years and has also spent some time in the UK as well.

Using The Calderdale Framework to implement a work based education programme for the Support Workers, within the CREST at CDHB.

Vicki Prout

Abstract:

The CREST Multi-disciplinary Team provides support to clients over 65 years following discharge from hospital.  The CREST model relies on the Physiotherapists providing daily exercise programmes for clients to regain their independence, these plans are executed daily by the KSW’s. Currently this education is classroom based and there is no clinical review of their competence.

The CF method ensures quality, is patient focused and leads to work based education on tasks and functions that are necessary to deliver patient focused treatment. This project will implement the Clinical Task Instructions (CTI’s) to certify that all KSW receive a consistent mechanism of training. Daily rehabilitation tasks are completed competently, safely and effectively to a high clinical standard to CREST community dwellings elders.

Rationale / Change question /scope of change

Research shows that keeping Elders in hospital has many negative consequences and Kleinpell et al (2008) demonstrated the greatest rehabilitation gains for this client group can be made within their home environment. Allied Heath recruitment is difficult in Canterbury, services within CDHB regularly has vacancies[5]. It is imperative that we are utilising these specialist professions effectively, simple tasks can be delegated to non-registered health professionals. Nancrow (2005) report that CF CTI’s provide confidence in delegation for the health professionals, and for the KSW, confidence in what tasks are within their boundaries.


Biography: