Interprofessional learning using escape rooms

A/Prof. Narelle Campbell1, Ms Leigh Moore1

1Flinders NT, Darwin, Australia

Abstract:

Aims: This workshop will introduce participants to escape rooms as an interprofessional learning activity, facilitate their participation in a healthcare escape room, and provide opportunity to analyse and capitalise on the learning potential of escape rooms.
Escape rooms are a purposeful physical adventure game where teams use clues and strategy to solve a series of puzzles and thus ‘escape’. Mindful of the ever-changing landscape in remote regions’ placement capacity, and inspired by the team-building and problem-solving involved in escape rooms, we are exploring the potential of this platform as a novel, inter-professional, educational resource for students.

Methods: In this workshop we will explain the phenomenon of escape rooms, present our literature findings on the use of escape rooms to promote learning, and explain our research design process and multi-pronged strategy (high school engagement; health professional student placement learning). Attendees will then participate in our healthcare escape room scenario ‘Nanna’s nightmare’.

Discussion / recommendations :Following the scenario, we will invite participant feedback and discussion. This section will focus on the perceived value of the experience for health professional placement students. This will include harnessing the attendees ideas on possible interprofessional learning objectives, key learning for specific professions, and how to design sustainable remote and rural placement programs that provide quality interprofessional learning.


Abstract:

Narelle is a speech pathologist by background with an academic career that has spanned medicine, nursing and allied health. Her current role is heading up the FlindersNT RIPPL (Remote and Rural Interprofessional Placement Learning) team. This involves working with a group of fabulous academics who are zealous in helping students and supervisors succeed in remote placements that offer quality learning. In order to contribute solutions to the recruitment and retention issues in the remote workforce, Narelle’s PhD investigated the personality traits of remote allied health professionals. She lives in Darwin.
Leigh works as an academic with FlindersNT in developing placements and supporting the workforce in allied health and nursing. She is a community pharmacist who has worked in rural and remote areas of NSW and the Northern Territory. Her involvement in education of medical and pharmacy students started in 2007. She has also held roles with the Pharmaceutical Society of Australia and the Asthma Foundation of the NT. Leigh is particularly interested in interprofessional education, rural/remote practice and research to benefit communities and practitioners.