The 5 Human Rights Strategies to Close the Gap

Mrs Amanda Jackson1

1Rights Focus, Molendinar, Australia

Abstract:

Context:Everyone is striving to close the gap – yet something more is needed. This work considers how role diversity influences the perception of the patients’ rights of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. This work also considers if reflection from a diverse perspective on healthcare interactions with patients could highlight more ways to improve patients experience and consequentially help close the gap.

Process:Involved observation and consideration of multidisciplinary viewpoints on approach, purpose and style in the provision of healthcare including rights advice. Disciplines include medical, nursing, allied health, law, risk and human rights. Interactions between healthcare providers and patients during healthcare were considered through the authors lens of indigeneity, human rights expertise and experience with complex communication.

Analysis:Analysis revealed 5 strategic areas likely to positively effect interactions with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples and significantly improve patient’s perception of health service.

Outcomes and Worksop Learning Objectives:The 5 Human Rights Strategies Every Health Service Must  Develop to Close the Gap; understanding patient’s rights from the patient’s perspective; build skills to speak cross culturally with a person of another culture about their rights; understand and meet First Nation rights; give way for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients to exercise their right to decide their treatment and care from their (the patients) frame of reference;  and take occupational responsibility to meet patient rights.


Biography:

Amanda Jackson explains rights to help everyone understand.

She brings human rights and law, philosophy, psychology and history together into one understanding. She is of Butchulla descent and her motto is burangaman (hear, think, understand, know). The vision of her business Rights Focus is ‘making rights our focus.’

Amanda holds a Bachelor of Arts (psychology and law) and Bachelor of Laws from the University of Queensland.  She practiced as a lawyer in Queensland for 20 years with special interest in societies most vulnerable people including children, the aged, and people who are ill or dying. She has worked as Mediator. She has worked for Queensland Health for the last three years most recently in human rights. Amanda has presented at international conferences on topics where law and social science overlap in the fields of risk management, child safety in care, presumption of capacity and changed communication of the ill and dying. Let’s make rights our Focus!